Government funding of VET 2018

By NCVER Statistical report 4 December 2019 978-1-925717-42-6

Introduction

In November 2017, the reporting framework for the new National VET Funding Collection was endorsed by Australian vocational education and training (VET) Ministers. This new approach to reporting provides information on the flow of VET government funds and insight into who provided funding, what was funded and who benefited. The collection scope, implemented over a three-year period, includes direct and indirect government funding for VET, including government assistance to employers for workforce training and apprenticeship employment.

About this publication

This publication presents information on government funding for VET in Australia and reports on:

  • governments’ contributions to VET and funding allocations across states and territories
  • VET funding by VET activities and funding distributions across training or student characteristics
  • the value of public VET assets of property, plant and equipment.

Government provisions for VET loans are presented separately in this publication.

Data have been sourced from the National VET Funding Collection 2018. For further information refer to VET Funding.

Tables and graphs should be read with the table notes, and explanatory information provided with this publication. For clarity in interpreting the figures, please print in colour.

Highlights

In 2018, government funding provided through VET appropriations and VET intergovernmental funding arrangements totalled x billion, an increase in nominal terms of $xxx.x million (x.x%) compared to 2017.

This includes:

  • the Australian Government contributing $2.8 billion, a decrease of $325.8 million (10.6%)
  • state and territory governments contributing $3.4 billion, an increase of $191.3 million (6.0%).

In 2018, compared with 2017, the Australian Government also provided:

  • $xxx.x for VET Student Loans (including grandfathered VET FEE-HELP loans), an increase of $x.x million (X.x%)
  • $xxx.x for Trade Support Loans, an increase of $x.x million (X.x%).

In 2018, VET funds distributed totalled $x billion, an increase in nominal terms of $xxx.x million (x.x%) compared to 2017.

In 2018 compared with 2017, funds distributed across VET activities were:

  • $xxxx.x million for direct VET delivery, an increase of $xx.x million (x.x%)
  • $xxx.x for employer assistance to engage in VET, an increase of $xx.x million (x.x%)
  • $xxx.x for student assistance for equipment, travel and other costs, an increase of $xx.x million (x.x%)
  • $xxx.x million for system administration, governance and capital investment, an increase of $xx.x million (x.x%).
 

Governments' contributions and allocations

Government contributions provide information on the source of government funding, while allocations show funding amounts after the flow of VET funds from the Australian Government to state and territory governments under intergovernmental funding arrangements has been taken into account.

In 2018, compared with 2017, government:

  • recurrent funding decreased by $xxx.x million (xx.x%) to $xxxx.x million
  • capital funding decreased by $xxx.x million (xx.x%) to $xxxx.x million.

In 2018:

  • ongoing specific purpose payments associated with the National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development were $x.xx million
  • time-limited funding for VET outcomes agreed under the National Partnership Agreement Skilling Australians Fund was $xxxx.x million.
Figure 1   Funding contributions by jurisdiction ($ million) - 2018
Table 1   Funding contributions by jurisdiction ($ million)
 
Figure 2   Funding allocations by jurisdiction ($ million) - 2018
Table 2   Funding allocations by jurisdiction ($ million)
  • Notes:In 2017, time-limited funding payments were provided under the National Partnership Agreement for Skills Reform.
  • In 2018, time-limited funding payments were provided under the National Partnership Agreement Skilling Australians Fund.
Australian Government provision for VET loans

The Australian Government provides funding for two income-contingent loan schemes, the VET Student Loans program (which includes grandfathered VET FEE-HELP loans) and the Trade Support Loans program.

In 2018, compared with 2017, the Australian Government provided:

  • VET Student Loans (including VET FEE-HELP loans) to the value of $xxx.x, an increase of $x.x million (X.x%)
  • Trade Support Loans to the value of $X million, an increase of $x.x million (X.x%).
Figure 3   Provision for VET loans ($ million) - 2018
 
Table 3   Provision for VET loans ($ million)
  • Notes:VET Student Loans reporting includes the VET Student Loans program and loan arrangements for the grandfathered VET FEE-HELP program, which ceased on 31 December 2016.
  • The reported value of VET Student Loans excludes estimated loan expenses and all state and territory contributions.
Transfers for VET Student Loans

States and territories contribute 50% of the cost of a loan debt not expected to be repaid (DNER) by state-subsidised students using the VET Student Loans or the grandfathered VET FEE-HELP program. The DNER rate is an actuary calculation based on the full amount of outstanding loans.

The reported amount is what states and territories transfered to the Commonwealth in the given year.

In 2018, states and territories paid $x.x million towards the DNER loan costs for state-subsidised students.

For more detail, refer to Government funding of VET 2018: data tables.

Funding activities and distributions (excluding loan values)

Funding activities provide information on how VET funds are spent within a jurisdiction, regardless of funding source.

Funding is spent directly on VET delivery and student assistance for equipment, travel and other costs, and indirectly on initiatives in support of the VET system, such as VET governance, capital growth and incentives to industry to support workforce training and apprenticeship employment.

In 2018, compared with 2017, total spending on:

  • direct VET delivery decreased by $x.x million (X.x%) to $x.x million
  • employer assistance decreased by $x.x million (X.x%) to $x.x million
  • student assistance decreased by $x.x million (X.x%) to $x.x million
  • capital investment decreased by $x.x million (X.x%) to $x.x million
  • system administration and governance decreased by $x.x million (X.x%) to $x.x million.
Figure 4   VET funding activities ($ million) - 2018
 
Table 4   VET funding activities ($ million)
  • Notes:Employer assistance includes incentive payments to employers for employing an apprentice or reskilling their workforce.
  • Student assistance includes funding for student equipment, travel and other costs, completion incentives and general support services.
  • System administration and governance is net of revenue collected by authorities on fees for services provided, registration charges and sale of materials.
VET funding distributions

Funding distributions report on VET funding amounts allocated by training characteristics, including apprenticeship status, provider type, level of education and training package qualifications. Training characteristics only apply to particular funding activities, for example provider type is relevant only for VET delivery and capital funding. For more information refer to the explanatory notes.

Reported amounts are dependent on how the jurisdiction has spent funds within the funding activity. For example VET delivery funding ($x.x billion in 2018; refer to table 4) comprises a number of funding streams, several of which may be difficult to report by the required training characteristics, but remain a direct or indirect cost to the training outcome. These amounts are reported as funding not attributable by reporting category.

Funding distribution reporting may be based on actual, modelled or estimated data. Please refer to explanatory notes: jurisdictional information.

 
Selected funding activities (VET delivery, employer assistance and student assistance) by apprenticeship status

In 2018, compared with 2017, spending on:

  • apprenticeships decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • non-apprenticeships decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • funding not attributable by apprenticeship status decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million.
Figure 5   Selected funding activities (VET delivery, employer assistance and student assistance) by apprenticeship status ($ million) - 2018
Table 5   Selected funding activities (VET delivery, employer assistance and student assistance) by apprenticeship status ($ million)
  • Notes:'Apprenticeships' refers to apprenticeships and traineeships.
  • Funding not attributable by apprenticeship status captures funding costs associated with training delivery, support, administration and operational base funding. Caution needs to be taken when analysing apprenticeship status data due to the large amount of reported funding not attributable by apprenticeship status. For further details, refer to explanatory notes: funding distribution reporting.
 
Selected funding activities (VET delivery and capital funding) by provider type

In 2018, compared with 2017:

  • payments to public providers decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • payments to private providers decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • payments to other providers decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • payments to other organisations decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • funding not attributable by provider type decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million.
Figure 6   Selected funding activities (VET delivery and capital funding) by provider type ($ million) - 2018
Table 6   Selected funding activities (VET delivery and capital funding) by provider type ($ million)
  • Notes:Public providers include technical and further education (TAFE) institutes, skills institutes, polytechnic and government universities.
  • Private providers include education/training business or centre: privately operated registered training organisation.
  • Other providers includes enterprise registered training organisations (RTOs), community-based adult education RTOs, industry-associated RTOs and school RTOs (public, private and independent).
  • Other organisations are other training organisations that are not RTOs.
  • Funding not attributable by provider type captures funding costs associated with training delivery, support, administration and operational base funding. Caution needs to be taken when analysing provider type data due to the large amount of reported funding not attributable by provider type. For further details, refer to explanatory notes: funding distribution reporting.
 
Selected funding activity (VET delivery) by level of education

In 2018, compared with 2017:

  • spending on diploma or higher level programs decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • spending on certificate IV programs decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • spending on certificate III programs decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • spending on certificate I, II and other programs decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • funding not attributable by level of education decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million.
Figure 7   Selected funding activity (VET delivery) by level of education ($ million) - 2018
Table 7   Selected funding activity (VET delivery) by level of education ($ million)
  • Notes:Other programs include non-award programs, skill sets, bridging or enabling courses not identifiable by level and training not elsewhere classified.
  • Non-award programs are training programs that do not lead to an Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) qualification.
  • Training not elsewhere classified includes standalone subjects that can be nationally-recognised or non-nationally-recognised.
  • Funding not attributable by level of education captures funding costs associated with training delivery, support, administration and operational base funding. Caution needs to be taken when analysing level of education data due to the large amount of reported funding not attributable by level of education. For further details, refer to explanatory notes: funding distribution reporting.
 
Selected funding activity (VET delivery) by top five funded training package qualifications

In 2018, compared with 2017, the top five training packages by amount spent were:

  • Community Services: $x.x million, decrease of $x.x million (x.x%)
  • Construction, Plumbing & Services Integrated Framework: $x.x million, decrease of $x.x million (x.x%)
  • Health: $x.x million, decrease of $x.x million (x.x%)
  • Electrotechnology: $x.x million, decrease of $x.x million (x.x%)
  • Tourism, Travel and Hospitality: $x.x million, decrease of $x.x million (x.x%).
Table 8   Selected funding activity (VET delivery) by top 5 funded training package qualifications ($ million)
  • Notes:Training package qualifications are listed on the National Training Register, Training.gov.au.
  • Non-training package qualifications and courses include non-award programs, accredited programs (nationally-accredited and locally-accredited) and training not elsewhere classified.
  • Funding not attributable by training package qualifications captures funding costs associated with training delivery, support, administration and operational base funding. Caution needs to be taken when analysing training package data due to the large amount of reported funding not attributable by training package qualifications. For further details, refer to explanatory notes: funding distribution reporting.
  • For detailed reporting on training package qualifications refer to Government funding of VET 2018: data tables.
Tax exemptions and rebates

State, territory and Australian governments forego revenue in the form of payroll tax exemptions, offsets or rebates for eligible apprentices and trainees.

In 2018, compared with 2017, estimated revenue foregone through tax exemptions, offsets and rebates to:

  • employers decreased by $x.x million (X.x%) to $x.x million
  • students decreased by $x.x million (X.x%) to $x.x million.
 
  • Notes:Under employer tax exemptions, eligible employers may claim a payroll tax rebate on wages paid to apprentices and eligible trainees recognised by a state training authority. Wages include superannuation, allowances and fringe benefit payments.
  • Payroll tax is subject to state/territory law. A payroll tax liability applies when an employer's monthly wage bill exceeds the payroll tax threshold applicable in the jurisdiction.
  • Student rebates include state car registration rebates.
  • Tax exemption and rebate data are not available for all states and territories
  • For detailed reporting on tax exemptions and rebates, refer to Government funding of VET 2018: data tables.

VET Student Loans activity

The Australian Government provided VET Student Loans (including VET FEE-HELP loans) to the value of $x.x million.

In 2018, compared with 2017, loans provided to:

  • full-fee paying students were $X million, an increase of $x.x million (X%)
  • state-subsidised students were $X million, an increase of $x.x million (X%).
Figure 8   Government provision for VET Student Loans ($ million) - 2018
Table 9   Government provision for VET Student Loans ($ million)
Loan valuesNSWVic.QldWASATas.NTACTTotal
Full-fee paying students
201848.114.453.28.310.01.60.13.3139.0
2017123.839.9133.412.921.30.30.16.0337.7
State-subsidised students
201822.487.826.214.84.81.30.10.8158.2
201721.095.625.315.05.31.40.10.7164.4
TOTAL
201870.4102.279.423.114.92.90.24.2297.3
2017144.8135.5158.728.026.61.70.26.7502.2
% change 2017-2018-51.3-24.5-50.0-17.4-44.265.812.1-38.2-40.8
Rounding can lead to situations where the numbers in the body of a given table may not add to the rounded totals.
  • Notes:The reported value of VET Student Loans excludes estimated loan expenses and state and territory contributions.
  • Reporting includes the VET Student Loans program and loan arrangements for the grandfathered VET FEE-HELP program.
  • Full-fee paying students may borrow up to the full amount of their training where the cost of their course is not subsidised by government.
  • State-subsidised students may borrow part tuition costs, as part of their training costs have been subsidised by their state or territory training authority.
  • Under the VET Student Loans program, loans can only be provided to the extent of the loan cap that applies to the course.
  • Loan values are presented by the state/territory that subsidised the training (for subsidised students) or by the borrowing student's home address (for full-fee paying students).
  • Loan values exclude any upfront payments made by the student.
 
VET Student Loans distribution by provider type

In 2018, compared with 2017, loan payments to:

  • public providers decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • private providers decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million.
Figure 9   VET Student Loans distribution by provider type ($ million) - 2018
Table 10   VET Student Loans distribution by provider type ($ million)
  • Notes:Public providers include technical and further education (TAFE) institutes, skills institutes, polytechnic and government universities.
  • Private providers include education/training business or centre: privately operated registered training organisation.
  • Reporting includes the VET Student Loans program and loan arrangements for the grandfathered VET FEE-HELP program.
 
VET Student Loans distribution by level of education

In 2018, compared with 2017, VET Student Loans (including VET FEE-HELP loans) for:

  • graduate diploma courses decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • graduate certificate courses decreased by $0.6 million (94.0%) to less than $0.1 million
  • advanced diploma courses decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million
  • diploma level courses decreased by $x million (x.x%) to $x.x million.
Figure 10   VET Student Loans distribution by level of education ($ million) - 2018
Table 11   VET Student Loans distribution by level of education ($ million)
  • Notes:The VET Student Loans program provides loan support to eligible students studying higher level VET qualifications (diploma and above). Loan amounts are capped and available for courses that address industry needs; for further information refer to the Australian Government Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business, VET Student Loans Statistics, at https://www.employment.gov.au/vet-student-loans.
  • Reporting includes the VET Student Loans program and loan arrangements for the grandfathered VET FEE-HELP program.
 
VET Student Loans distribution by top five funded training package qualifications

In 2018, compared with 2017, the top five training packages by loans issued were:

  • Health: $x.x million, a decrease of $x million (x.x%)
  • Aviation: $x.x million, decreased of $x million (x.x%)
  • Creative Arts and Culture: $x.x million, decreased of $x million (x.x%)
  • Community Services: $x.x million, decreased of $x million (x.x%)
  • Hairdressing and Beauty Services: $x.x million, decreased of $x million (x.x%).
Table 12   VET Student Loans distribution by training package qualifications ($ million)
  • Notes:Training package qualifications are listed on the National Training Register, Training.gov.au.
  • Non-training package qualifications and courses include non-award programs, accredited programs (nationally-accredited and locally-accredited) and training not elsewhere classified.
  • For detailed reporting of each training package qualification, refer to Government funding of VET 2018: data tables.
  • Reporting includes the VET Student Loans program and loan arrangements for the grandfathered VET FEE-HELP program.
 

Public VET assets of property, plant and equipment

In 2018, compared with 2017, the value of public VET assets for:

  • buildings and land were $x million, a decrease of $X.X (x.x%)
  • plant, equipment, motor vehicles and other were $x million, a decrease of $X.X (x.x%).
Figure 11   Public VET assets of property, plant and equipment ($ million) - 2018
Table 13   Public VET assets of property, plant and equipment ($ million)
  • Note:Jurisdictions' asset valuation policies impact reported totals. For further detail on jurisdictional accounting policies refer to: Government funding of VET 2018: jurisdictional asset accounting policies.
 

Further information

For terms and definitions refer to the download section below.

Reporting is subject to the accounting policies for each state and territory. For more information refer to <https://www.ncver.edu.au/research-and-statistics/collections/vet-funding-and-finance>.

Data in this publication may be revised for a variety of reasons. For the latest data on Government funding of VET 2018, please visit the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) Portal <https://www.ncver.edu.au>.

For detailed reporting, refer to Government funding of VET 2018: data tables.

Explanatory notes

Scope

  1. Information contained in this publication is, unless stated otherwise, derived from the National VET Funding Collection, which is compiled under the Australian Vocational Education and Training Management Information Statistical Standard (AVETMISS): the standard for VET funding data — release 1.1, which will be available on full implementation of the National VET Funding Collection.
  2. The data are sourced from the administrative records held by the Australian Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business, state/territory training authorities and other relevant bodies where applicable. Some funding provided by government departments other than those with responsibility for training may not be captured.
  3. The collection scope captures direct subsidies for training, government loans, and indirect support for training outcomes through initiatives such as employer incentives to hire apprentices. It also includes government funding for system administration and governance of the VET system and VET-related transfers between governments.
Other information
  1. Differences may exist between jurisdictions' funding contributions and overall spend. These reflect funds not spent during the reporting period, or funding provided outside the normal budget process.
  2. Where expenditure could reasonably belong to multiple funding activities, amounts were categorised based on its primary purpose.
  3. Negative amounts reflect the reclaiming of funds not spent.
  4. Reporting activity is from 1 January to 31 December 2018. Reporting is in nominal terms.
Exclusions
  1. Table totals exclude the following, which are reported separately:
    • tax exemptions, offsets and rebates used for supporting employers to engage in the VET system
    • rebates for eligible apprentices and trainees
    • loan values.
Funding distribution reporting
  1. Certain funding activities are able to be split by dimensions of apprenticeship status, provider type, level of education, and training package qualification. The ability to split by training characteristic is limited by the nature of the funding activity, for example employer assistance funding can only be split by apprenticeship status. The full breakdown of funding activities by training characteristics is shown in figure 12, with a dot representing where a split is possible.
  2.  
    Figure 12   Funding activities and applicable training characteristics
    Diagram showing funding activities which relate to funding distribution categories
  3. Funding distribution amounts are determined by how the jurisdiction has reported their funding activity (see table 4). For example, the reported funding activity of VET delivery is the total of nine funding streams: VET subsidies for training, block funding, VET in Schools funding, other funding, funding from other organisations, fee assistance funding, learner needs funding, community service funding and operational base funding. The ability to split funding streams by training characteristics is limited to the nature of the funding stream. For example VET subsidies for training places can be easily split by training characteristics whereas community service payments may be more difficult. Community service payments are direct and associated costs but cannot be attributed to a reporting category so are reported as 'funding not attributable'. Caution needs to be taken when analysing these data due to the large amount of reported funding not attributable by the training and student characteristics.
Information on VET Student Loans reporting
  1. Loan values are calculated as the full tuition fee charged, less any upfront payment.
  2. Debts not expected to be repaid (DNER) is an actuary calculation based on all VET Student Loans including those under the grandfathered VET FEE-HELP program.
Australian Government
  1. Reporting based on actual data unless noted.
  2. Table 1: Ongoing specific-purpose payments are the funding mechanism through which the Commonwealth supports states' efforts in delivering services in key sectors. Figures above are those agreed under the National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development. Time-limited funding is Commonwealth funding to states and territories for the delivery of outcomes agreed under National Partnership Agreements or Project Agreements. In 2017, time-limited funding payments were provided under the National Partnership Agreement for Skills Reform. In 2018, time-limited funding payments were provided under the National Partnership on the Skilling Australians Fund.
  3. Table 3: Figures represent the full value of loans issued, and are not reduced for estimates of loan expenses (debt not expected to be repaid), or state and territory contributions toward loan expenses. VET Student Loans amounts include funds borrowed for the cost of tuition but exclude any loan surcharges that may apply. 2017 figures include grandfathered loan arrangements under the closed VET FEE-HELP program, which closed on 31 December 2016. 2018 figures also include a limited number of VET FEE-HELP loans which were extended under exceptional circumstances.
    Transfers for VET Student Loans — Debts not expected to be repaid (DNER) is an actuarial calculation based on the experiences of the VET Student Loans and VET FEE-HELP programs. Figures represent transfers to the Commonwealth during the reported year.
  4. Table 4: System administration and governance funding includes the Australian Government Scholarship Program for South Australia, which provides support to vocational education and training, undergraduate and postgraduate students to undertake training, study or industry-based work placement in priority industries in South Australia.
  5.  
  6. Table 6: Negative figures reported against the Australian Government represent the accounting treatment (payment reversal) for accrued supplier expenses.
    Tax exemptions and rebates — Tax exemptions and rebates exclude Australian Government income tax deductions, such as for self-education expenses.
  7. Table 9: Students may borrow up to a capped amount for their tuition. Full-fee paying students face a loan surcharge, which is added to their loan but not included in the figures above. The Australian Government is responsible for the issuance of VET Student Loans. For the purposes of this report, loan values are reported against the state/territory that subsidised the training (for subsidised students), or by the student’s residential address (for full-fee paying students). 2017 figures include grandfathered loan arrangements under the closed VET FEE-HELP program, which closed on 31 December 2016. 2018 figures also include a limited number of VET FEE-HELP loans which were extended under exceptional circumstances.
  8. Table 11: The VET Student Loans program provides loan support to eligible students studying higher level VET qualifications (diploma and above). Loan amounts are capped and are available only for specified courses.
  9. Table 13: Figures relate only to the assets of publically owned training providers. The Australian Government does not own any training providers.
  10. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the Australian Government Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business.
New South Wales
  1. Actual data used for funding distributions.
  2. Tax rebate amounts are not able to be captured.
  3. Funding not attributable includes $810m of TAFE block funding for the purchase of block training hours, workforce reform expenditure, operational costs, community service obligations and costs relating to capital expenditure.
  4. $20m of VET in School funding was spent to deliver VET accredited courses in schools, $16m for Government schools and $4m for Non-Government schools.
  5. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the New South Wales Department of Industry.
Victoria
  1. Revisions to last year’s submission: Victorian "pre-accredited" training has been reclassified from block funding to subsidy for training places. This change is based on further consideration of the appropriate classification in line with the data standard.
    Dimensional data was revised for VET Delivery. Dimensional data that was not able to be reported against learner needs funding for the 2018 collection, and was instead reported against subsidies. Since dimensional information can now be reported against learner needs funding, this has been adjusted for 2017 and 2018 data in this year’s submission.
  2. VET in Schools: VET in Schools funding only indicates funding provided to public schools.
  3. Operational/Base Funding by provider type: Attribution of funding by provider type was undertaken at the program level, as internal systems are still being implemented to fully capture this data. Programs that are primarily directed towards a particular provider type have been fully reported against that provider type. In all cases, the main provider type accounts for at least 80% of expenditure under the program.
  4. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the Victorian Department of Education and Training.
Queensland
  1. Recurrent contributions from the State (appropriation) are based on actual payments received by the Department of Employment, Small Business and Training for the reporting period.
  2. Reporting is based on actual data with expenditure values extracted on an accrual basis.
  3.  
  4. VET Delivery funding includes non-attributable funds reported in the dimensional data. This funding is generally not able to be broken down to the dimensional reporting levels at this stage and is mainly related to:
    • funding provided to public providers for the State Contribution Grant that is only able to split out by Provider Type at this stage
    • training delivery expenditure accruals are not yet reported at lower levels (Queensland is reviewing accrual processes to endeavour to reduce the value of non-attributed training activity related to accruals)
    • VET in Schools training delivery (excluding school based apprentices/trainees) not yet split out for this collection.
  5. Tax exemptions and offsets data has been provided by Queensland Treasury and WorkCover Queensland.
  6. Capital funding relates to the Queensland Department of Employment, Small Business and Training capital programs and timing of payments and includes public providers — TAFE Queensland and Central Queensland University (VET Operations).
  7. System Administration and Governance reporting for the 2018 year includes VET corporate overhead costs, these were not included by the former Queensland Department of Education and Training in the 2017 data collection.
  8. Public VET asset change relate to asset revaluations, acquisitions and movements and work in progress costs and movements including the public providers — TAFE Queensland and Central Queensland University (VET operations).
  9. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the Queensland Department of Employment, Small Business and Training.
Western Australia
  1. A range of training options and courses are available and subsidised under Jobs and Skills WA. High priority training areas include apprenticeships, eligible traineeships, priority industry qualifications and foundation skills. Purchasing priorities are based on government training priorities broadly set out in the State Training Plan. High priority training (i.e. Apprenticeships and traineeship, priority industry qualifications and foundation qualifications) receive a higher subsidy. Lower priority general industry training is capped in TAFE and private RTO contracting arrangements. A ‘price-setter’ model is used for almost all publicly-subsidised training in WA, whereby a funding rate is set for both TAFE and contracted private RTOs. WA uses a model that recognises an agreed average full delivery cost for different categories of training delivery. Training subsidy rates are rationalised into a set of average rates, with loadings provided for delivery in regional and remote areas. Loadings include salary/award condition loadings, class size loadings, base cost loadings, housing costs, and goods and purchases. The public subsidy is calculated by deducting the regulated student fee from the agreed full delivery cost. This methodology ensures RTOs receive the agreed full delivery cost by way of the combined public subsidy and student fees.
  2. Reporting is based on actual data unless noted.
  3. Table 4: Total direct subsidies for VET in WA is based on full cost payments to TAFE Colleges and Private RTOs. VET Delivery funding includes VET in Schools funding provided to TAFE Colleges and private providers for the delivery of VET to school students. Does not include delivery of VET funded by the Department of Education. VET Delivery funding includes funding provided to TAFE Colleges for delivery to Prisons. Does not include delivery of VET funded by the WA Department of Justice. Tax exemptions, offsets and rebates — for employers of apprentices and trainees is a 17/18 financial year estimate.
  4. Table 5: Apprenticeship Status information: Allocation of funding across Apprenticeships is modelled as the TAFE component is estimated as a result of the proportional distribution of supplementary provider funding across training package qualifications. Private RTO component is based on actual funding allocations.
  5.  
  6. Table 6: Provider type information: Allocation of funding across provider type is modelled as the TAFE component is estimated as a result of the proportional distribution of supplementary provider funding across training package qualifications. Private RTO component is based on actual funding allocations.
  7. Table 8: Training Package information: Allocation of funding across training packages is modelled as the TAFE component is estimated as a result of the proportional distribution of supplementary provider funding across training package qualifications. Private RTO component is based on actual funding allocations.
  8. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the Western Australia Department of Training and Workforce Development.
South Australia
  1. Reporting is based on actual data unless noted.
  2. Tax exemptions, offsets and rebates — for employers of apprentices and trainees not applicable in South Australia.
  3. South Australia has used actual data from the financial systems of the Department for Innovation and Skills and aligned this financial data with activity data collated from the Department's training and apprenticeship information systems to break down amounts by dimensions. Whilst high level independent checks have been undertaken, minor classification variances within the SA dataset are possible.
  4. Table 1: Recurrent contributions from the State (appropriation funded training costs) has been calculated as the net cost of providing services being total external expenditure less Commonwealth revenue and other external revenue sources.
  5. Table 4: VET Delivery funding includes VET in Schools funding provided to TAFE Colleges and private providers for the delivery of VET to school students. Does not include delivery of VET funded by the Department of Education.
  6. Table 5: Funding not attributable by apprenticeship status is primarily related to block funding, VET in Schools and other supplementary provider funding such as supports for learner needs, community services payments and other costs associated with being a public provider.
  7. Table 6: Funding provided to the other organisation category represents rental payments made to Renewal SA (as the owner of key TAFE SA campuses) for the use of VET infrastructure. Renewal SA is not a registered training provider.
  8. Table 7: Funding not attributable by level of education is mainly related to rental payments to Renewal SA (as the owner of key TAFE SA campuses) for the use of VET infrastructure, block funding, VET in Schools and other supplementary provider funding such as supports for learner needs, community services payments and other costs associated with being a public provider.
  9. Table 8: Funding not attributable by training package qualifications is mainly related to rental payments to Renewal SA (as the owner of key TAFE SA campuses) for the use of VET infrastructure, block funding, VET in Schools and other supplementary provider funding such as supports for learner needs, community services payments and other costs associated with being a public provider.
  10. Table 13: The South Australian 2019—20 State Budget approved the transfer of ownership of key TAFE SA campuses from Renewal SA to TAFE SA, which will increase the asset base for the 2019 publication.
  11. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the South Australia Department for Industry and Skills.
Tasmania
  1. Reporting is based on actual data unless noted.
  2. Tax exemptions, offsets and rebates — for employers of apprentices and trainees have been estimated.
  3. Non attributable reporting: is a result of funding arrangements aimed at achieving broader objectives than a single divisional reporting category.
  4. Table 4: VET Delivery funding does not include VET in Schools funding.
  5. Table 5: Apprenticeship status information is based on actual data from the financial systems of the Department of State Growth — Skills Tasmania.
  6. Table 6: Provider type information is based on actual data from the financial systems of the Department of State Growth — Skills Tasmania.
  7.  
  8. Table 7: Level of education information is based on actual data from the financial systems of the Department of State Growth — Skills Tasmania.
  9. Table 8: Training Package information is based on actual data from the financial systems of the Department of State Growth — Skills Tasmania.
  10. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the Tasmanian Department of State Growth — Skills Tasmania.
Northern Territory
  1. Reporting based on actual data unless noted.
  2. Tax exemptions, offsets and rebates for employers of apprentices and trainees — not applicable in the Northern Territory.
  3. Non attributable reporting is a result of insufficient data being available to allow the funding achievement to be modelled for that particular attribute.
  4. Table 4: Total VET Delivery includes VET in Schools funding provided to TAFE colleges, universities and private providers for the delivery of VET to school students and VET in School funds administered by the Department of Education.
  5. Table 5: Apprenticeship status information: Allocation of funding across the apprenticeship status attribute is modelled across both private and TAFE due to the way funding achievement is identified and recorded.
  6. Table 6: Provider type information: Allocation of funding across provider type is modelled across both private and TAFE due to the way funding achievement is identified and recorded.
  7. Table 7: Level of education information: Allocation of funding across level of education attribute is modelled across both private and TAFE due to the way funding achievement is identified and recorded.
  8. Table 8: Training package information: Allocation of funding across training package attribute is modelled across both private and TAFE due to the way funding achievement is identified and recorded.
  9. Data, notes and caveats have been provided by the Northern Territory Department of Trade, Business and Innovation — Workforce NT.
Australian Capital Territory
  1. Data have been provided by the Australian Capital Territory Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development Directorate — Skills Canberra.

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