Pre-vocational programs and their impact on traineeship completion and satisfaction

By Damian Oliver, Tom Karmel Occasional paper 31 October 2011 ISBN 978 1 921955 62 4 print; 978 1 921955 61 7 web

Description

Pre-vocational programs, including VET in Schools, are increasingly providing a pathway into traineeships in the same way that pre-apprenticeships are an established route into apprenticeships in the traditional trades. This report uses data from the 2010 Apprentice and Trainee Destination Survey and finds that the benefits of pre-vocational programs are mostly apparent for early school leavers (especially those who leave school after Year 11) and trainees in sales, clerical and administrative, and labouring occupations.

Summary

About the research

Pre-vocational programs, including VET in Schools, are providing a pathway into traineeships in the same way that pre-apprenticeships are an established route into apprenticeships in the traditional trades. This report is a parallel piece to an earlier report on the effect of pre-apprenticeships on apprentice satisfaction and completion rates.

Key messages

  • Early school leavers, especially those who leave school after Year 11, are more likely to complete a traineeship if they have completed a pre-vocational course beforehand.

  • Trainees in lower-skilled occupational categories such as sales workers, labourers, and machinery operators and drivers are more likely to complete their training if they have completed a pre-vocational course beforehand. Pre-vocational programs also increase the likelihood of completing a clerical and administrative traineeship.

  • Pre-vocational courses reduce the likelihood of trainees in higher-skilled occupational categories (such as managers and professionals) completing their training. Pre-vocational programs also reduce the likelihood of completing a traineeship in community and personal services.

  • The findings suggest that pre-vocational programs should focus on general employment and educational skills and give less emphasis to developing advanced occupational skills. They appear to be more relevant to the lower-skilled section of the labour market, and it could be concluded that traditional Year 12 is a better preparation for trainees in the more skilled occupations.

Tom Karmel
Managing Director, NCVER

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